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This section of Rocky Creek passes through conglomerate which was heavily eroded by the fast moving melt waters of the upstream glacier
The conglomerate has been worn back to revel its component rocks cut off in section
This section of Rocky Creek is about 500metres upstream from the car park and is where the glacier actually dropped its load. These rocks show the sharp edges typical of rock which has been crushed in a glacier and deposited where it melts
Varved siltstones (ie. thinly banded, showing a cyclical repetition of thin and thick layers) representing seasonal deposition of muds and silts from glacial melt water. These are located upstream in the glacier melt zone
Varved siltstones (ie. thinly banded, showing a cyclical repetition of thin and thick layers) representing seasonal deposition of muds and silts from glacial melt water. These are located upstream in the glacier melt zone

Rocky Creek Glacial Area

Latitude -30.034734, Longitude 150.316958

Located in the North West Region of NSW, nearest town Bingara

Source: with permission of Bob & Nancy Brown http://www.brovey.yolasite.com

You can download a detailed Geological Tour covering this district from the above web link.

Link to Detailed Map

This is a very beautiful area and a great place to have a picnic, stroll or a swim. There is a large parking area with toilets and primitive camping.

The Conglomerate rocks in the base of nearby Rocky Creek are composed of a range of granite, volcanic and sedimentary rock pebbles and boulders which were eroded from the landmass by one or more glaciers more than 300 million years ago. The well rounded boulders in the conglomerate are the product of high energy water currents, capable of moving large sediment loads downstream from a glacier. The churning water and sediments rapidly remove the sharp edges of the glacial material forming typical alluvial pebbles and boulders of a similar size with little sand between the pebbles which suggests sorting by current activity.

The real glacial site is about 500 metres upstream and can be accessed by walking up Rocky Creek or you can take the track that leaves the main road some 500 metres on the Narrabri side of the Glacial Area. The track is a rough 4WD and needs careful driving. The last decent to the river is steep and full of large holes and probably better if walked.

You will encounter an area of prominent outcrops in Rocky Creek that show the typical glacial features of angular pebbles and boulders, with abundant sand and finely ground rock. Note the high proportion of angular and oddly shaped rocks, the presence of many with flat faces and very sharp edges, all indicative of plucking from the walls of a glacier by ice movement.

Varved siltstones (ie. thinly banded, showing a cyclical repetition of thin and thick layers) are also present, representing seasonal deposition of muds and silts from glacial melt water. The varved siltstones contain abundant drop-stone pebbles and boulders which were transported in fragments of glacial ice and were released during melting, sending the rocks to the bottom of the lake where they were embedded in the silt. This lake would be typical of the large water bodies adjacent to the end of a substantial glacier.

Getting There

To find the glacial area travel along Killarney Gap Road between Narrabri and Bingara there is a well signposted "Glacial Area" located on the northern side of the road about 40km south west from Bingara and 65km north east from Narrabri. Note that the real glacial rocks are about 500m upriver from the parking area. There is plenty of accommodation in both Bingara and Narrabri but book early as there is much mining activity in the region and sometimes the motels are booked out. You can camp at the parking area or park your van. There are on-site toilets.


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